Toltec Mounds and King Cotton

With no concrete plans one recent weekend, I decided to visit two historic sites near Little Rock. Toltec Mounds was my first stop. I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect, but the museum and outdoor trails were pretty interesting. According to artifact dating, Native Americans created a ceremonial gathering place at these Toltec Mounds from 660 until 950 A.D. There were a total of eighteen mounds at one time, but only three stand today. One theory proposes that the location of these mounds allowed the Native Americans to determine the winter and summer solstice as well as the equinox. Knowing these dates helped with timing their crop planting and harvesting. Additionally, this location was also thought to be a gathering place for local tribes to celebrate special occasions. The outdoor walking trails are pretty neat; they wind through the mounds and perimeter of the park. It is unknown why the location was abandoned, but needless to say, these people were pretty clever to survive on the land for that long.

My next stop was the Plantation Agriculture Museum. Surprisingly, I was greeted by the curator upon walking through the front door as I think it was a pretty slow day for the museum. Nonetheless, I thoroughly enjoyed my time learning about cotton in Arkansas. Cotton was a way for life for many in the state in the 1800s, and the process of plowing, cultivating, and harvesting the crop required much labor. Since I am a generation or two removed from agricultural and manual labor, I don’t think I possess quite the appreciation for the effort required to farm. However, looking at the information and pictures in this museum I almost had a longing for the satisfaction of a hard day’s manual labor. These workers picked cotton from sunrise until sunset, and over time, the process evolved from slavery to sharecroppers to the cotton gin.

There was actually an entire cotton processing operation setup in one building. This processing involved separating the cotton from the seeds and then compressing the cotton into bails. Another building highlighted information about the storage and transportation of cotton. A local enterprising cotton farmer established a warehouse along railroad lines for convenient transportation. Overall, this museum was pretty cool. While modest in size, all the displays were really interesting and well-organized. After touring this place, I definitely have a new respect for cotton workers and now realize how much effort was probably required to make my favorite pair of jeans.

 

 

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